Education

The hub for all your learning resources.

Here you will find all our clinical education resources from articles to recorded webinars, all supporting equitable access to funded medicines.

Prescribers wanting to block angiotensin II effects can consider the remaining funded ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers. ACE inhibitors and ARBs are similarly effective for hypertension, chronic renal disease and diabetic nephropathy, but ARBs are better tolerated.2 ACE inhibitors are preferred over ARBs first-line for heart failure and post myocardial infarction.2

Read the HAH Bulletin to find out more.

Contributor
He Ako Hiringa
19 July 2021
7 minutes to Read

Dulaglutide, a once-weekly injectable medicine, will soon be available for second-line treatment of type 2 diabetes. As most people with type 2 diabetes will require an injectable therapy at some stage, it is important to build acceptability early in the patient journey.

Contributor
Louise Roche Farmer
29 June 2021
15 minutes to Delve

When clinically indicated, empagliflozin can be started in adult patients with type 2 diabetes using the steps shown in this resource.

Talking points, relevant for all patients starting empagliflozin, are provided along with two algorithms and accompanying prescribing notes. Which algorithm you follow will depend on your patient’s level of hypoglycaemia risk. 

Contributor
Richard French, Brendan Duck
21 May 2021
2 minutes to Read + 43 minutes to Explore

Focusing on the experiences of older Māori in primary care, this course comprises four short videos, an independent reflection, downloadable posters and additional resources.

The course is endorsed by RNZCGP and CNA(NZ) and meets PCNZ recertification requirements. Reflection templates are included for you to complete.

Contributor
Jo Hikaka
18 May 2021

This Quality Improvement Activity enables you to review the glycaemic management of your type 2 diabetes patients and identify those who may benefit from initiation or intensification of blood glucose lowering medicines.

Good glycaemic control has a clear benefit on microvascular outcomes and if started early enough, on long-term macrovascular outcomes of coronary artery disease, stroke and peripheral vascular disease.

This is a Measuring and Improving Outcomes (MIO) activity that meets RNZCGP CPD requirements.

Contributor
He Ako Hiringa
3 May 2021
20 minutes to Read

Māori attitudes to healthcare today are deeply rooted in New Zealand history. In this article, Deborah Bassett-Clarke discusses some reasons why the current model of pharmacy practice does not always meet the needs of Māori and may actually cause health inequities. Understanding these factors is an important first step to improving outcomes for Māori.

Contributor
Deborah Bassett-Clarke
30 April 2021
2 minutes to Delve

Medicine affordability is one of the five drivers of medicine access equity.

Up to 40 per cent of people continue to pay prescription copayments even though they are entitled to an exemption.No person or family should pay more than $100 per annum for subsidised medicines.

Read the HAH bulletin to find out more. 

Contributor
He Ako Hiringa
30 April 2021